Australian politics, society & culture

Racism

How outrage at overt racism helps to hide the more pervasive kind
By André Dao
New films from Ryan Coogler, Gabriela Cowperthwaite and Morgan Neville
By Luke Davies
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
Fraser, Hawke, Keating and Howard in Retirement
By George Megalogenis
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
By Robert Manne
Words: Shane Maloney | Illustration: Chris Grosz
By Shane Maloney and Chris Grosz
Ted Kotcheff's 'Wake In Fright'.
Revisiting ‘Wake in Fright’
By Kate Jennings
Words: Shane Maloney | Illustration: Chris Grosz
By Shane Maloney and Chris Grosz
'We Are One': Barack Obama delivering his pre-inaugural speech, Lincoln Memorial, 18 January 2009. Image: USAF
Learning from America
By Waleed Aly
Damien Wright & his table
By Gideon Haigh
Every so often, Damien Wright will down tools to work on his computer, answer emails, update files. It's OK. He can do it. For a day, anyway - maybe two. Then his back will begin to ache, his eyes to tire, and he will grow ever so slightly nervous. He struggles to explain how he became, without a minute's formal
By Chloe Hooper
In a bunker-like hall in Townsville a boxing ring is set up under fluorescent strip lights and 200 people - trainers, enthusiasts, pugilists past and present - sit in monsoonal heat, watching two ten-year-old Aboriginal boys punching the stuffing out of each other. The boys are competing for a 2008 Australian Amateur
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
By John Hirst
Convicts and national character
By John Hirst
What to me seems the most challenging question in Australian history receives commonly a very confident answer. What effect did the convicts have on our national character? Answer: they made us an anti-authoritarian people. The best antidote to this view is still an article written 40 years ago by Henry Reynolds,
Barack Obama speaks at American University. © Flickr/Will White
What he must do to win
By Noel Pearson
Inside New Zealand’s social laboratory
By Craig Sherborne
If a revolution ever happens in Australia, it won't start in Australia. We're not that kind of people. We follow; we don't lead. If a revolution happens, it will happen overseas first. New Zealand, for instance. The perfect place for an ideas summit. A small revolution might come of it, not bombs and corpse-lined
The road to the apology
By Robert Manne
In a recent conversation the novelist Alex Miller told me he thought people who claimed that they hadn't known, until relatively recently, that Aboriginal children had been forcibly removed from their families were lying. I didn't have the heart to tell him that, until the publication of Bringing Them Home in 1997, my

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