December 2005 - January 2006

Arts & Letters

‘Vulture’; ‘Sunday Arts’; ‘The Movie Show’ on ABC-TV

By Kerryn Goldsworthy

Any poet could have told the ABC that with a name like Vulture its new arts program was bound to get negative feedback. A vulture is an ugly, disgusting creature whose presence lets you know your death is imminent.This may be why one blogger, having watched the first episode, said it made him lose the will to live. It’s all over for the year now, and it wasn’t that bad really. But Vulture did get eviscerated early on after attracting savage responses to its comedy sketches – the very thing that was supposed to make the show new and different. This left it with the panel-of-experts format, but expertise doesn’t necessarily translate into good screen presence, as anyone who’s seen the movie Broadcast News should know.

Good arts TV is more likely to feature artists producing art than talking heads discussing it, hence the inclusion on the ABC’s Sunday Arts of artists’ workshops and poets in residence. Even The Movie Show’s David Stratton and Margaret Pomeranz are essentially performers, acting out the personae they have developed over the years and delivering set-pieces to camera. They break up the chat with clips and interviews, and they don’t talk at or over the top of each other to the apparent exclusion of the viewer.

Kerryn Goldsworthy

Cover: December 2005 - January 2006

December 2005 - January 2006

From the front page

Misleading parliament? A-OK

Peter Dutton’s was an open-and-shut case

In The Big House

The quintessential American cultural experience is still college football

Image of Vincent van Gogh’s ‘Portrait of Joseph Roulin’

‘MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art’

An eye candy-laden, educational treasure hunt of an exhibition

Illustration

The return of the Moree Boomerangs

The First on the Ladder arts project is turning things around for a rugby club and the local kids


In This Issue

Enough already!

Peter Jensen

Mr. Huge

Alan Woods and his amazing computer. A nags-to-riches-story
Words: Shane Maloney | Illustration: Chris Grosz

Nellie Melba & Enrico Caruso

How many sleeps?

Nothing prepares a parent for the day their partner does a runner and takes the children

More in Arts & Letters

Image of Leonard Bernstein

Leonard Bernstein: show tunes and symphonies

Centenary celebrations highlight the composer’s broad ambitions and appeal

Still from Leave No Trace

The hermitic world of Debra Granik’s ‘Leave No Trace’

The ‘Winter’s Bone’ director takes her exploration of family ties off the grid

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Low’s ‘Double Negative’: studies in slow transformation

Twelve albums in, the Minnesota three-piece can still surprise in their unique way

Covers of Motherhood and Mothers

To have or not to have: Sheila Heti’s ‘Motherhood’ and Jacqueline Rose’s ‘Mothers’

Heti’s novel asks if a woman should have a child; Rose’s nonfiction considers how society treats her if she does


More in Noted

‘One Hundred Years of Dirt’ by Rick Morton

A social affairs reporter turns the pen on himself

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‘John Mawurndjul: I Am the Old and the New’ at the MCA, Sydney

The celebrated bark painter’s ethos guides this retrospective exhibition

Cover of Kudos

‘Kudos’ by Rachel Cusk

A masterful trilogy concludes

Image of Michael Cook, Court (2014), no. 7 from the Majority Rule series

‘Colony’ at NGV Australia

Twin exhibitions explore the very different experiences of settlement for European and Indigenous peoples


Read on

Image of Vincent van Gogh’s ‘Portrait of Joseph Roulin’

‘MoMA at NGV: 130 Years of Modern and Contemporary Art’

An eye candy-laden, educational treasure hunt of an exhibition

Image of Malcolm Turnbull and Peter Dutton

Turnbull fires back

Unlike Tony Abbott, Malcolm Turnbull never promised ‘no wrecking’

Image from ‘In Fabric’

Toronto International Film Festival 2018 (part one)

A British outlier and a British newcomer are among the stand-outs in the first part of the festival

Image from ‘Patrick Melrose’

Benedict Cumberbatch is perfect as the imperfect Patrick Melrose

The actor brings together his trademark raffishness and sardonic superiority in this searing miniseries


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