November 2019


Magazine

November 2019

Revolutions past

The strip-search state

Picking up the pieces

The promised land

A way home: Archie Roach

Picking up the pieces

Anthony Albanese wants to be a Labor leader, not an Opposition leader


The Monthly Essays

How good is Queensland?

Voices from the state that has turned against Labor as a party of federal government

Picking up the pieces

Anthony Albanese wants to be a Labor leader, not an Opposition leader

The promised land

Bougainville’s independence vote is a historic moment for Papua New Guinea, and a reckoning for Australia


The Nation Reviewed

Revolutions past

Labor and the Liberals have abandoned their old ideological contests as they battle to define the values of the new middle class

The strip-search state

Successful compensation cases haven’t curbed the prevalence of unlawful strip-searches by NSW Police

Bait and switch

Lumping dingoes in with “wild dogs” means the native animals are being deliberately culled

Yellow submarine

A former Russian athlete’s plan for Australia’s first commercial sub


Arts & Letters

Radical ambiguity: Jia Tolentino, Rachel Cusk and Leslie Jamison

The essay collections ‘Trick Mirror’, ‘Coventry’ and ‘Make It Scream, Make It Burn’ offer doubt and paradoxical thinking in the face of algorithmic perfectionism

Late style: Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Irishman’

Reuniting with De Niro, Pacino and Pesci, the acclaimed director has delivered less of a Mob film than a morality play

A way home: Archie Roach

The writer of ‘Took the Children Away’ delivers a memoir of his Stolen Generations childhood and an album of formative songs



Noted

‘Civilization: The Way We Live Now’ The beautiful photographs of often grim subjects in NGV Australia’s exhibition raise questions over the medium’s power to critique By Quentin Sprague

‘The Testaments’ by Margaret Atwood The Booker Prize–winning sequel to ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ is an exhilarating thriller from the “wiliest writer alive” By Helen Elliott

‘The Man Who Saw Everything’ by Deborah Levy The British author experiments with a narrative structure that collapses past and present By Stephanie Bishop


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