May 2021

Arts & Letters

Lodestar: ‘Supernova’

By Shane Danielsen
Stanley Tucci and Colin Firth star in Harry Macqueen’s quiet elegy to a loving relationship in its twilight

Shane Danielsen

Shane Danielsen is a screenwriter and former artistic director of the Edinburgh International Film Festival.

Cover of The Monthly, May 2021
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From the front page

Image of Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese in Question Time today. Image via ABC News

Back to the future

Will Labor find its spine on the stage-three tax cuts?

Still from Ema

Dance dance revolution: ‘Ema’

Pablo Larrain’s beguiling, difficult film seeks to understand an impenetrable anti-heroine for whom the city is a dancefloor

Illustration by Jeff Fisher

A load of abalone

The trial of Keith Nye highlights how fisheries laws unfairly target Indigenous people

The era of Xi Jinping

On the China Dream and the guiding ideology of Xi Jinping


In This Issue

Image of artwork by Sarah Goffman

Ill-informed consent

How piecemeal relationship and sexuality education is failing our schoolchildren

Image of “Man working” (Rufus Wilton), Nepabunna, circa 1930

Sole of a nation

The untold Aboriginal history of the R.M. Williams boot

Image of artwork by Sarah Goffman

The moment of reckoning

Any addressing of parliament’s abuse, misogyny and sexism must also tackle its racism

Image of Patricia Lockwood

Mind over meta: ‘No One Is Talking About This’

The debut novel from the extremely online Patricia Lockwood considers how the virtual invades the real


More in Arts & Letters

Image of Patricia Lockwood

Mind over meta: ‘No One Is Talking About This’

The debut novel from the extremely online Patricia Lockwood considers how the virtual invades the real

Image of Pharaoh Sanders and Sam Shepherd

Always tomorrow: ‘Promises’

Legendary saxophonist Pharoah Sanders joins electronic musician Floating Points and the London Symphony Orchestra for a compositionally minimalist album

Girls don’t cry: Arlo Parks and Phoebe Bridgers

Two young musicians spark the old double standard of judging female artists who demonstrate their pain

The death of Yokununna: ‘Return to Uluru’

Mark McKenna explores Australia’s history of violence, dispossession and deception through one tragic incident


More in Film

Amorality tale: ‘Judas and the Black Messiah’

Told from an unexpected perspective, Shaka King’s film is one of the best recent-historical dramas

Still from ‘Nomadland’

Drawn to the drift: Chloé Zhao’s ‘Nomadland’

The award-winning film about America’s itinerants steers away from the darker stories of the working poor

Still from ‘High Ground’

Once upon a time in the north: ‘High Ground’

Stephen Maxwell Johnson’s foray into Australia’s violent colonial history is a visually spectacular, if overfamiliar, revisionist Western

Image from ‘Mank’

Citizen plain: ‘Mank’

David Fincher’s biopic of Orson Welles’s collaborating writer favours technique over heart


Read on

Still from Ema

Dance dance revolution: ‘Ema’

Pablo Larrain’s beguiling, difficult film seeks to understand an impenetrable anti-heroine for whom the city is a dancefloor

The era of Xi Jinping

On the China Dream and the guiding ideology of Xi Jinping

Still from Shane Meadows’ ‘The Virtues’

Vice grip: ‘The Virtues’

Shane Meadows’ astonishing series stems from a late reckoning with his own childhood abuse

Cover image of ‘The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen’

Body language: ‘The Three Burials of Lotty Kneen’

Echoing folktales and fables, Krissy Kneen’s memoir contemplates the body’s visceral knowledge of inherited trauma