July 2017

Vox

by Steven Amsterdam

A few questions before you go

How do we decide how we die?

Steven Amsterdam

Steven Amsterdam is a Melbourne-based writer and palliative care nurse. He is the author of Things We Didn’t See ComingWhat the Family Needed and The Easy Way Out.

July 2017

From the front page

Labor’s Green energy plan

Bill Shorten makes a $15 billion pitch to end the climate wars

Image from ‘Widows’

The Windy City is wild and weighty in ‘Widows’

Social commentary and thrills struggle for balance in Steve McQueen’s take on the heist genre

Image of Eddie Perfect

Eddie Perfect goes to Broadway

The Australian composer has two musicals – ‘Beetlejuice’ and ‘King Kong’ – opening in New York

Image of Polly Borland’s ‘Untitled (Nick Cave in a blue wig)’

Polly Borland’s x-ray vision

The Australian artist in conversation about ‘Polyverse’ at the NGV, Nick Cave and dress-ups


In This Issue

Illustration

To walk in two worlds

The Uluru Statement is a clear and urgent call for reform

Her eloquent heart

Arundhati Roy’s ‘The Ministry of Utmost Happiness’ was worth the 20-year wait

Illustration

The handshake

Could Donald Trump finally force Australia to critically examine its feudal obligations to the US?

Politics gets personal

Laura Poitras’ ‘Risk’ sidesteps the biggest question about Julian Assange


Read on

Image from ‘Widows’

The Windy City is wild and weighty in ‘Widows’

Social commentary and thrills struggle for balance in Steve McQueen’s take on the heist genre

Image of Polly Borland’s ‘Untitled (Nick Cave in a blue wig)’

Polly Borland’s x-ray vision

The Australian artist in conversation about ‘Polyverse’ at the NGV, Nick Cave and dress-ups

Image of Scott Morrison and Mike Pence at APEC 2018

Cooperation takes a back seat at APEC

As tensions between the US and China rise, it’s getting harder for Australia not to take sides

Image from ‘Westwood: Punk, Icon, Activist’

‘Westwood: Punk, Icon, Activist’, an incomplete portrait

This nostalgic documentary about the eminent designer raises more questions than it answers


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