In light of recent events
Court cover-ups

Thugs, drink-driving teens, rapists, even the innocent, have appeared on the news for years, often peeking out from under a variety of props in an effort to hide their identity. Most recently I spotted someone walking to the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court with her face buried in a daggy zebra-print shawl. She’d been charged with attempting to murder her husband by poisoning his meal of meatballs, and clearly didn’t want her mug on the evening news. But while I discovered the shame is often the same, the effort that those accused put in to their pitiful subterfuge varies. Here, I rank a few recent efforts: 



Oslo Davis

Oslo Davis is a widely published illustrator, artist and cartoonist. His latest book is Overheard – The Art of Eavesdropping.


In This Issue

Illustration

The mystery of Malcolm Turnbull

What does the prime minister stand for, and when will we find out about it?

Self effacing

‘Mike Parr: Foreign Looking’ brings the anti-institutional artist to the National Gallery of Australia

Illustration

New students

Welcome to the Collingwood English Language School

Please stand

National anthems reflect all the complexities – and oddities – of the countries they represent


Read on

Image from ‘House of Cards’

The magnificently messy ‘House of Cards’

The show that made Netflix a major player comes to a satisfying and ludicrous end

Image of Scott Morrison and the ScoMo Express

The ScoMo Express backfires

The PM’s farcical bus tour cements spin over substance as his brand

Image from ‘Suspiria’

Twisted sisters: Luca Guadagnino’s ‘Suspiria’

Sentimentality ruins the magic of this otherwise unsettling and actively cruel film

Image from ‘The Other Side of the Wind’

Orson Welles’s ‘The Other Side of the Wind’ and Morgan Neville’s ‘They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead’

The auteur’s messy mockumentary and the documentary that seeks to explain it are imperfect but better together


×
×