December 2016 – January 2017

Arts & Letters

Instructions for a lover

By Sarah Holland-Batt
A poem

 

Bring me lemons and mint, a pitcher’s fishbowl
loaded with ice and slices of cucumber,

a Tom Collins in a tumbler, the fizz of it.
Give me sulphur summer heat, tarry sidewalks,

a tired hydrant geysering over the street,
a plane ticket to the Virgin Islands or Madrid

and Saturday languor, bedsheets wicking away
sweat after sex, buy me a highball from a hotel bar

in another hemisphere, book me a room
at the Savoy or the Ritz, play me sweet low cello

or Carmen McRae, pour me a glass of Beaujolais,
give me an argument I can sink my teeth into all week,

learn how to dig in your heels, for god’s sake,
slap me clean across the face with Riviera breeze,

and above all, take note of all the things I say –
pull me closer, push me away.

Sarah Holland-Batt

Sarah Holland-Batt is a poet. Her most recent book is The Hazards.

Cover

December 2016 – January 2017

From the front page

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Gulpilil’s surrealist performances reveal our collective unconscious

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The death of cool: Michel Piccoli, 1925–2020

Re-watching the films of the most successful screen actor of the 20th century

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In This Issue

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The author stays out of the picture, and other personal rules of writing

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The electorate has fractured into three economic and cultural zones

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‘O’Keefe, Preston, Cossington Smith: Making Modernism’ brings together three giants of modernism


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