March 2014

Encounters

Shane Maloney and Chris Grosz

Chips Rafferty & The Monkees

He’d been a drover, a shearer, a roo shooter, a timber cutter, a fisherman and a boundary rider. He could surf, write poetry and paint watercolours. But when John William Pilbean Goffage began to be noticed as an actor, he though he should get himself a better name. He considered Slab O’Flaherty but settled on Chips Rafferty. It had the right larrikin ring.

Rafferty might have stepped straight out of a Russell Drysdale painting. Born in 1909 at Billy Goat Hill near Broken Hill, he was lean and lanky with a lopsided grin – the very picture of the uncomplicated, cigarette-rolling bushman of national legend. His first role was a non-speaking part in a Dad and Dave film, but when Charles Chauvel cast him in the wartime features Forty Thousand Horsemen and The Rats of Tobruk, Chips won fame as the embodiment of the unassumingly heroic digger. Postwar, he rode into Australian iconography in The Overlanders and the Smiley films.

Local work dried up during the long cinema production drought of the 1950s, and Rafferty took his acting skills to Hollywood. In 1962’s Mutiny on the Bounty, he was the ship’s blind fiddler. Between “arrgghs”, he played languid games of chess with Marlon Brando. Mostly he played character roles in television series, westerns like Gunsmoke and The Big Valley.

In October 1967, hey hey, it was The Monkees. Season two, episode 12.

Known as “the Prefab Four”, The Monkees were created to be the instant stars of a sitcom about an imaginary band that wanted to be The Beatles. The episodes were chaotic, absurdist frolics targeted at teenage girls. The songs were merely a way to cash in on the television audience’s enthusiasm. Only after the series went to air and they were allowed to play instruments did The Monkees become an actual band.

In ‘Hitting the High Seas’, the boys get deckhand jobs aboard a pirate ship captained by a demented Rafferty. Chips takes to his role with scene-chewing gusto that culminates in a madcap cutlass fight with Davy Jones to the strains of ‘Daydream Believer’. Soon after, Rafferty returned to Australia permanently to live in the house he’d built on a bush block at Sydney’s Pittwater.

The Monkees was cancelled after 58 episodes. Jones, Peter Tork, Micky Dolenz and Mike Nesmith went on to make Head, a movie about “the nature of free will, conceived and edited in a stream-of-consciousness style”. Chips Rafferty died of a heart attack in 1971, aged 62. His ashes were scattered over his favourite fishing spot.

Shane Maloney and Chris Grosz

Shane Maloney is a writer and the author of the award-winning Murray Whelan series of crime novels. His 'Encounters', illustrated by Chris Grosz, have been published in a collection, Australian Encounters.

Chris Grosz is a book illustrator, painter and political cartoonist. He has illustrated newspapers and magazines such as the Age, the Bulletin and Time.

March 2014

From the front page

Image of police station in Alice Springs with red handprints on wall

What really happened at Yuendumu?

The promised inquiries must answer the biggest questions raised by the police shooting of an Aboriginal man

On the demerits

The government’s union-busting legislation is in the balance

You could drive a person crazy: Noah Baumbach’s ‘Marriage Story’

Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson are at their career best in this bittersweet tale of divorce

Image of ‘Wild River, Florida’

‘Civilization: The Way We Live Now’

The beautiful photographs of often grim subjects in NGV Australia’s exhibition raise questions over the medium’s power to critique


In This Issue

Andrew Bolt and Tony Abbott. © Jason Edwards / Newspix

The conservative crusade against the ABC

Why do Andrew Bolt and company love to hate the national broadcaster?

The last of the Panamanian golden frogs are to be found in a “frog hotel” in El Valle de Anton. Photo: Brian Gratwicke

Stories of extinction

Andrew Glikson’s ‘Evolution of the Atmosphere’, Elizabeth Kolbert’s ‘The Sixth Extinction’, Errol Fuller’s ‘Lost Animals’ and Clifford Frith’s ‘The Woodhen’

© Peter E Barnes

Hi-tech architecture in Adelaide

The South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute

The Tasmanian election

The ALP, the Libs, the Greens, the split


More in Arts & Letters

Image of Jia Tolentino

Radical ambiguity: Jia Tolentino, Rachel Cusk and Leslie Jamison

The essay collections ‘Trick Mirror’, ‘Coventry’ and ‘Make It Scream, Make It Burn’ offer doubt and paradoxical thinking in the face of algorithmic perfectionism

Image of Archie Roach

A way home: Archie Roach

The writer of ‘Took the Children Away’ delivers a memoir of his Stolen Generations childhood and an album of formative songs

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Late style: Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Irishman’

Reuniting with De Niro, Pacino and Pesci, the acclaimed director has delivered less of a Mob film than a morality play

Still from Todd Phillips’ ‘Joker’

No one’s laughing now: Todd Phillips’ ‘Joker’

A gripping psychological study of psychosis offers a surprising change of pace in the superhero genre


More in Encounters

Words: Shane Maloney | Illustration: Chris Grosz

Rupert Murdoch & Kamahl

Mark Oliphant & J Robert Oppenheimer

John Monash & King George V

John Howard & Uri Geller


Read on

Image of police station in Alice Springs with red handprints on wall

What really happened at Yuendumu?

The promised inquiries must answer the biggest questions raised by the police shooting of an Aboriginal man

You could drive a person crazy: Noah Baumbach’s ‘Marriage Story’

Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson are at their career best in this bittersweet tale of divorce

Blockade tactics

Inside the 2019 IMARC protests

Image of ‘How To Do Nothing’

‘How To Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy’

Jenny Odell makes a convincing case for moving beyond the ruthless logic of use


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