October 2013

Encounters

Shane Maloney and Chris Grosz

Rex Connor and Tirath Khemlani

Rex Connor had a dream. Like the man himself, it was a big one. Huge. Visionary. He imagined a rich, independent Australia built on mining, modern technology and a skilled workforce. And when he was appointed minister for minerals and energy, he thought he’d found a way to turn his vision into reality.

It was November 1974, and Connor was the third most powerful man in the Labor government. Encouraged by PM Gough Whitlam, he began looking for money to implement Labor’s policy of public participation in national development. A potential source lay in petro-dollars, the billions accumulating in the Middle East after the price of oil had quadrupled over the past year. But how to tap these funds at reasonable interest rates?

Enter Tirath Khemlani, a London-based Pakistani deal maker. Introduced to Connor by an Adelaide businessman, he talked up a storm, claiming that he could find up to $4 billion for a gas pipeline project.

A massive, shambling hulk of a man, nicknamed “the Strangler”, Connor had begun his political career as an alderman in his hometown of Wollongong. Suspicious and secretive, he accepted the assurances of his department that Khemlani was legit but refused to authorise him as an agent of the Australian government, issuing him instead with a mere expression of interest in obtaining a loan. Khemlani promised he would deliver within a month.

The month became six. Deals were always imminent, forever on the brink of success. Connor waited anxiously for news. He took to sleeping in his office, next to the telex machine. In fact, Khemlani had never raised a loan in his life. A shadowy figure, rumoured to have CIA connections, he spent his days in constant motion, trading commodities and subsisting on potato chips.

With a political scandal building around the so-called “loans affair”, Whitlam told Connor to pull the plug on the mysterious money man. But it was too late. “Old Rice and Monkey Nuts” sold his story to the newspapers and then, when Connor denied his version, arrived in Australia with bulging bags of documents. Locked in a cheap Canberra hotel room with lemonade, potato chips and Opposition front-bencher John Howard, he provided the pretext needed to block supply and bring down the Whitlam government.

Mission accomplished, Khemlani faded into obscurity. In 1981 he was convicted in New York of attempting to sell stolen securities but immediately pardoned. He died in Scotland in 1991. Rex Connor is buried in Dapto. Life, he said, is an equation in hydrocarbons.

Shane Maloney and Chris Grosz

Shane Maloney is a writer and the author of the award-winning Murray Whelan series of crime novels. His 'Encounters', illustrated by Chris Grosz, have been published in a collection, Australian Encounters.

Chris Grosz is a book illustrator, painter and political cartoonist. He has illustrated newspapers and magazines such as the Age, the Bulletin and Time.

October 2013

From the front page

No news is bad news

Australia’s free press is on life support

Image of Robyn Davidson

Something mythic

For Robyn Davidson, her acclaimed memoir ‘Tracks’ was an act of freedom whose reception hemmed her in

COVID-19 versus human rights

The virus is the latest excuse for governments to slash and burn the individual rights of prisoners

Image of Energy Minister Angus Taylor.

Road map to nowhere

Angus Taylor’s road map is anything but an emissions reduction strategy


In This Issue

Watching ‘Orange Is the New Black’

Pretty on the inside

Begging the Breaker’s pardon

Tim Winton’s ‘Eyrie’ and Richard Flanagan’s ‘The Narrow Road to the Deep North’

Light and shadow

The best of Australian arts 2013

Critics give their picks for the year’s top ten


More in Arts & Letters

Photograph of Malcolm Turnbull

Surrounded by pygmies: Malcolm Turnbull’s ‘A Bigger Picture’

The former PM’s memoir fails to reckon with his fatal belief that all Australians shared his vision

Still from ‘The Assistant’

Her too: ‘The Assistant’

Melbourne-born, New York–based filmmaker Kitty Green’s powerfully underplayed portrait of Hollywood’s abusive culture

Photograph of Dua Lipa

Snap-back: Dua Lipa’s ‘Future Nostalgia’

The British singer’s serendipitous album delivers shining pop with a reigning attitude of fortitude

Still from ‘The Platform’

Consolations in isolation: ‘The Platform’ and ‘Free in Deed’

What is the future of cinema without cinemas?


More in Encounters

Words: Shane Maloney | Illustration: Chris Grosz

Rupert Murdoch & Kamahl

Mark Oliphant & J Robert Oppenheimer

John Monash & King George V

John Howard & Uri Geller


Read on

Image of Robyn Davidson

Something mythic

For Robyn Davidson, her acclaimed memoir ‘Tracks’ was an act of freedom whose reception hemmed her in

COVID-19 versus human rights

The virus is the latest excuse for governments to slash and burn the individual rights of prisoners

Image of Energy Minister Angus Taylor.

Road map to nowhere

Angus Taylor’s road map is anything but an emissions reduction strategy

Into the slippery unknown: ‘The Gospel of the Eels’

Patrik Svensson’s eloquent debut is a hymn to the elusiveness of eels and an ode to family


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