April 2012

Arts & Letters

'Life in Movement' by Bryan Mason and Sophie Hyde

By Anna Goldsworthy
'Life in Movement' by Bryan Mason and Sophie Hyde 
(directors), in national release, 12 April

Tanja Liedtke’s name was suddenly everywhere in May 2007, when she was appointed artistic director of Sydney Dance Company. The 29-year-old dancer and choreographer claimed to be “absolutely ecstatic” about her new role, and there was a great deal of ecstasy in the arts industry too: a notable lack of pre-emptive poppy-lopping, the genuine hope of generational change. Three months later, Liedtke’s name made the headlines again. While walking through Crows Nest in the early hours of the morning she had been struck and killed by a rubbish truck.

The story is clearly tragic and yet Life in Movement, the new documentary about Liedtke’s life and art, is not entirely a tragic film. Filmmakers Bryan Mason and Sophie Hyde mine footage from Liedtke’s past, and follow a group of her dancers touring the world, posthumously performing her final work. With a pacy soundtrack by DJ Trip, it is a moving, powerful film about a powerful (and always moving) woman.

As a dancer, Liedtke was incandescent, her long limbs amplifying every gesture, her body flaming across the stage. Her choreography was muscular, witty and heartbreaking, marrying physical comedy to virtuosity and to virtuosity’s underside, vulnerability. As a director, she was gruelling. “I got to the point where I felt if I wasn’t achieving one of these notes I was destroying the show,” says one of her dancers. And yet her dancers were devoted to her, admitting that her death still feels like “someone taking away food”. The film gently examines the aftermath of her death, as her troupe continues to rehearse without her, rudderless and a little narky.

Some of the footage is so poignant as to be almost unbearable. “This is what you’re going to look like when you’re middle-aged,” says a friend, as an adolescent Liedtke goofs around in a wig. Other clips illuminate her artistic process. “Where’s Tanja?” asks a teenage friend as she clambers out of a school locker; later this is transformed into her claustrophobic work, Twelfth Floor.

Liedtke was not without self-doubt. When she locks herself in a studio for a week with a camera, you can feel the air bearing in around her, like the most oppressive of blank pages. “Pull yourself together, pull yourself together” she repeats, slapping herself across the face. It was these doubts that prompted the long nocturnal walks that finally killed her; it was also these doubts that fed her art. “It’s in the process of making that you solve those doubts,” observes her long-term partner and collaborator, Solon Ulbrich.

“What does Tanja want?” reads a handwritten list that flashes across the screen halfway through the film. She wants to be surrounded by “inspired and inspiring people”; she wants always to be “in motion”. This inspiring film allows her just that, for a little longer.

Anna Goldsworthy

Anna Goldsworthy is a pianist and writer. She is the director of the Elder Conservatorium of Music at the University of Adelaide.

There is nowhere quite like The Monthly. We are told that we live in a time of diminished attention spans; a time where the 24-hour-news-cycle has produced a collective desire for hot takes and brief summaries of the news and ideas that effect us. But we don’t believe it. The need for considered, reflective, long-form journalism has never been greater, and for almost 20 years, that’s what The Monthly has offered, from some of our finest writers.

That kind of quality writing costs money, and requires the support of our readers. Your subscription to The Monthly allows us to be the home for the best, most considered, most substantial perspectives on the state of the world. It’s Australia’s only current affairs magazine, an indispensable home for cultural commentary, criticism and reviews, and home to personal and reflective essays that celebrate and elevate our humanity.

The Monthly doesn’t just comment on our culture, our society and our politics: it shapes it. And your subscription makes you part of that.

Select your digital subscription

Month selector

From the front page

Osamah Sami with members of his local mosque

In ‘House of Gods’, Sydney’s Muslim community gets to be complicated

Plus, Barnaby Joyce shines in ‘Nemesis’, Emma Seligman and Rachel Sennott deliver ‘Bottoms’, and Chloë Sevigny and Molly Ringwald step up for ‘Feud: Capote vs. The Swans’.

U2 performing in the Las Vegas Sphere

Where the feats have no name: ‘U2:UV’ at Sphere

It’s no surprise it took U2 to launch post-stadium rock via a spectacular immersive show within the technical marvel of Las Vegas’s newest venue

Grace Tame running in the 2023 Bruny Island Ultra Marathon

Running out of trouble

How long-distance running changed the life of the former Australian of the Year (and earnt her a record win in an ultramarathon)

Illustration by Jeff Fisher

Might as well face it

Lively discussions take place around the country every week on ethical non-monogamy, love addiction and how much sex is too much

In This Issue

Illustration by Jeff Fisher.

A Romantic B&B

The Bourbon & Beefsteak in Kings Cross

A Port for the Soul

Aki Kaurismäki’s 'Le Havre'

Illustration by Jeff Fisher.

The Big Tumbleweed

The Docklands and the Broken Wheel

The Aztecs' album 'More Arse than Class', 1974. © Aztec Music

That Blockhead Thing

Aztec Music’s Archaelogical Dig


More in Noted

Still from ‘Boy Swallows Universe’

‘Boy Swallows Universe’

The magical realism in Netflix’s adaptation of Trent Dalton’s bestselling novel derails its tender portrayal of family drama in 1980s Brisbane’s suburban fringe

Cover of ‘Kids Run the Show’

Delphine de Vigan’s ‘Kids Run the Show’

The French author’s fragmentary novel employs the horror genre to explore anxieties about intimacy, celebrity and our infatuation with life on screens

Cover of ‘Question 7’

Richard Flanagan's ‘Question 7’

A slim volume of big ideas that takes in H.G. Wells, chain reaction, Hiroshima and the author’s near-death experience on the Franklin River

Scene from ‘The Curse’

‘The Curse’

Nathan Fielder directs and co-stars in an erratic comedy about the performative benevolence of a couple creating a social housing reality TV show


Online latest

Osamah Sami with members of his local mosque

In ‘House of Gods’, Sydney’s Muslim community gets to be complicated

Plus, Barnaby Joyce shines in ‘Nemesis’, Emma Seligman and Rachel Sennott deliver ‘Bottoms’, and Chloë Sevigny and Molly Ringwald step up for ‘Feud: Capote vs. The Swans’.

International Film Festival Rotterdam highlights

Films from Iran, Ukraine and Bundaberg were deserving winners at this year’s festival

Two women on a train smile and shake hands

‘Expats’ drills down on Hong Kong’s class divide

Plus, Netflix swallows Trent Dalton, Deborah Mailman remains in ‘Total Control’ and ‘Vanderpump Rules’ returns for another season

Image of a man playing music using electronics and the kora (West African harp)

Three overlooked albums of spiritual jazz from 2023

Recent releases by kora player John Haycock, trumpeter Matthew Halsall and 14-piece jazz ensemble Ancient Infinity Orchestra feel like a refuge from reality