December 2010 - January 2011

Essays

A touch of the sun

By David Malouf
'Photograph #03' from Marco Fusinato's 'Sun Series'. Courtesy of the artist and Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne.
'Photograph #03' from Marco Fusinato's 'Sun Series'. Courtesy of the artist and Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne.

Earlier than the sun

and stronger, our need

for comfort in the dark.

 

Always on time

with its doodle-do and smallgrass recitativo

we take the sun

 

as given, its shadow-play

of slats on a bed-sheet

(a hot thought

 

in a hot shade) semaphore

to the blood that knows nothing

of distinctions, dawn

 

from dusk, May from December. Or

in a deck-chair within sight

of the road,

 

and of rain-pool and melon-flower,

what sunlight

is to old bones.

David Malouf
David Malouf is an award-winning Australian author. His latest novel, Ransom, is inspired by Homer's Iliad.

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