December 2007 - January 2008

Arts & Letters

‘How to Talk about Books You Haven’t Read’ by Pierre Bayard

By Zora Simic

According to Pierre Bayard, a professor of literature at the University of Paris, you do not have to read books to be able to speak about them with confidence - even when standing at the lectern. What allows this subterfuge to continue is mutual complicity. Still, Bayard does not want to make readers feel ashamed of that pile of untouched volumes by the bed. Instead he demonstrates that not reading need not compromise intelligence. It may even enhance it: “With cultural literacy comes the inherent threat of vanishing in other people’s books, a threat it is vital to escape if we are to create any work of our own.”

Drawing on psychology, anthropology, pop culture and literature, Bayard considers the place of books in the postmodern world. “There is,” he writes, “a tacit understanding in our culture that one must read a book in order to talk about it with any precision.” Challenging this idea, he argues that not reading can improve your love life, ward off memory failure and prevent existential crises. Contrary to popular belief, Bayard claims, great literature cannot transcend time, place and culture. Rather, our reading - or non-reading - practices are shaped by our “collective libraries” and “inner books”.

These are audacious claims, and How to Talk about Books You Haven’t Read is a cheeky work. With that title, Bayard is daring people not to read his book and inviting bad jokes from reviewers. He is also guaranteeing healthy sales. In an era where publications about the Greatest Books of All Time are proliferating, Bayard has intuited that perhaps what is driving the market is not so much the urge to master the canon as the need for advice on pretending that you have. All the better, too, that he is French - we love having the French lecture us on how we can eat cheese and not get fat, or how philosophy can improve our lives. Yet this book is no gimmick. Truth be told, it is reading reviews such as this one that helps us talk about books we haven’t read. Bayard’s is a different proposition; it demands more than the skim-read he ruefully suggests is best practice.

Zora Simic

Cover: December 2007 - January 2008

December 2007 - January 2008

From the front page

Royal commission omission

Fingers are pointing everywhere but at the policy error

Image of Peter Dutton

South African farmers: we will decide

Australia, refugees and the politics of fear

Image from ‘The Americans’

‘The Americans’, the Russians and the perils of parallels

Why sometimes it’s better to approach art on its own terms

Image of Hugh Grant in ‘Maurice’

Merchant Ivory connects gilded surfaces with emotional depth

Restraint belies profundity in ‘Maurice’, ‘Howards End’ and more


In This Issue

Peter Craven's Best Books for Summer 2007-08

Mission drift

A report from Afghanistan
Words: Shane Maloney | Illustration: Chris Grosz

Kylie Minogue & Michael Hutchence

New Teeth for Aunty

Reinvigorating the national broadcaster

More in Arts & Letters

Image of Pompeii

Ceridwen Dovey’s ‘In the Garden of the Fugitives’

Reality flexes at the edges of Dovey’s second novel

Still from The Death of Stalin

Armando Iannucci’s ‘The Death of Stalin’

This Soviet satire pushes comedy’s tragedy-plus-time formula to the limit

Young Fathers’ ‘Cocoa Sugar’

The Scottish group’s third album proves they don’t sound like anyone else

Installation view of Mass by Ron Mueck, 2016–17

The NGV Triennial

A new exhibition series’ first instalment delivers a heady mix of populism and politics


More in Noted

Tim Winton’s ‘The Shepherd’s Hut’

One of Australia’s most acclaimed novelists offers a painful and beautiful story of redemption

Zadie Smith’s ‘Feel Free’

In this collection of essays, Smith shines when she’s addressing the personal

‘The Only Story’ by Julian Barnes

The meticulous novelist takes on the oldest subject there is

‘Lady Bird’ directed by Greta Gerwig

The debut director goes home to make a funny, touching film about wanting to leave it


Read on

Image of Peter Dutton

South African farmers: we will decide

Australia, refugees and the politics of fear

Image from ‘The Americans’

‘The Americans’, the Russians and the perils of parallels

Why sometimes it’s better to approach art on its own terms

Image of Hugh Grant in ‘Maurice’

Merchant Ivory connects gilded surfaces with emotional depth

Restraint belies profundity in ‘Maurice’, ‘Howards End’ and more

Image of Emily Blunt in ‘A Quiet Place’

‘A Quiet Place’, where silence means survival

John Krasinski’s latest film summons terror from the everyday


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