August 2012

Encounters

Shane Maloney and Chris Grosz

Hubert Opperman & Bruce Small

Word: Shane Maloney | Illustration: Chris Grosz
Word: Shane Maloney | Illustration: Chris Grosz

Hubert Opperman was a telegram delivery boy. At the beginning of the 1921 racing season, he joined a suburban cycling club and entered a distance race. It was hot and dusty on the unmade country roads but the 17 year old was gritty and tenacious. He kept pace with the experienced riders, the scratch men, and finished in third place.

The prize was a spanking new Malvern Star. Waiting at the finish line was the bike’s manufacturer, Bruce Small. Small had left school at 14 to become a printer’s devil, then a commercial traveller. Now 24, he had just sunk his life savings into the fledgling bicycle business. So far, Malvern Star was only producing 12 bikes a week but Small had a keen eye for publicity and he immediately recognised the commercial potential of the clean-cut young Oppy.

“He sold me on himself,” recalled Opperman, “at a most opportune moment in my life.” The two young men promptly forged a bond that was to make one of them rich and the other famous.

Riding for Malvern Star, Opperman won the Australian road title four times. In 1928, eager to test himself against the pedal-pushers of Europe, he joined the small Australasian team for the Tour de France. He finished 18th, then went on to win the Bol d’Or endurance event, riding 17 hours without dismounting, cheered on by a crowd of 50,000. He was met at home with a hero’s welcome. Other victories and world records soon followed.

More than just a sponsor, the energetic Small was Oppy’s manager, trainer, tactician, moral mainstay and investment adviser. At the height of the Depression, his protégé was as much a national symbol as Bradman and Phar Lap. In 1936, Allied Bruce Small Ltd went public. Eventually, there would be six Malvern Star factories and a thousand dealerships.

The war marked the end of Opperman’s sporting career. He joined the RAAF and rose to flight lieutenant, then joined the Liberal Party and rose to Minister for Transport. Small, meanwhile, made a gazillion by turning banana plantations into Florida-style canal estates. Running on the slogan ‘Think Big, Vote Small’, he was elected mayor of the Gold Coast in 1967 and put boosterism into bikinis by inventing meter maids.

Oppy continued cycling until he was 90 and died on an exercise bike in a retirement village with “No Cycling” signs. A stalwart of the solo euphonium, Small is commemorated by a smallish statue in Elkhorn Avenue, Surfers Paradise.

Shane Maloney and Chris Grosz

Shane Maloney is a writer and the author of the award-winning Murray Whelan series of crime novels. His 'Encounters', illustrated by Chris Grosz, have been published in a collection, Australian Encounters.

Chris Grosz is a book illustrator, painter and political cartoonist. He has illustrated newspapers and magazines such as the Age, the Bulletin and Time.

There is nowhere quite like The Monthly. We are told that we live in a time of diminished attention spans; a time where the 24-hour-news-cycle has produced a collective desire for hot takes and brief summaries of the news and ideas that effect us. But we don’t believe it. The need for considered, reflective, long-form journalism has never been greater, and for almost 20 years, that’s what The Monthly has offered, from some of our finest writers.

That kind of quality writing costs money, and requires the support of our readers. Your subscription to The Monthly allows us to be the home for the best, most considered, most substantial perspectives on the state of the world. It’s Australia’s only current affairs magazine, an indispensable home for cultural commentary, criticism and reviews, and home to personal and reflective essays that celebrate and elevate our humanity.

The Monthly doesn’t just comment on our culture, our society and our politics: it shapes it. And your subscription makes you part of that.

Select your digital subscription

Month selector

From the front page

Kim Williams seen through window with arms half-raised

The interesting Mr Williams

At a time when the ABC faces more pressure than ever before, is its new chair the right person for the job?

Illustration by Jeff Fisher

Letter from Dunkley

As a byelection draws the nation’s focus to the scrappy suburb of the author’s childhood, a visit reveals the damage wrought by the housing crisis

Exterior of the Department of Treasury, Canberra

Tax to grind

Tax reform should not be centred on what we want, but on who we want to be

Rehearsal for the ABC TV show ‘Cooking with Wine’, March 13, 1956

Whose ABC?

Amid questions of relevance and culture war hostilities, the ABC’s charter clearly makes the case for a government-funded national broadcaster

In This Issue

A boat moored on Ballarat's Lake Wendouree in 2007. © Ian Kenins

How vested interests defeated climate science

A Dark Victory

Illustration by Jeff Fisher.

Switching Clubs

Classic Car Restoration

The Cactus Channel. © Oscar Strangio

Spreading the Groove

Melbourne’s funk scene

Illustration by Jeff Fisher.

Tatts Lotto

The Business of Tattoo Removal


More in Encounters

Words: Shane Maloney | Illustration: Chris Grosz

Rupert Murdoch & Kamahl

Mark Oliphant & J Robert Oppenheimer

John Monash & King George V

John Howard & Uri Geller


Online latest

Osamah Sami with members of his local mosque

In ‘House of Gods’, Sydney’s Muslim community gets to be complicated

Plus, Barnaby Joyce shines in ‘Nemesis’, Emma Seligman and Rachel Sennott deliver ‘Bottoms’, and Chloë Sevigny and Molly Ringwald step up for ‘Feud: Capote vs. The Swans’.

International Film Festival Rotterdam highlights

Films from Iran, Ukraine and Bundaberg were deserving winners at this year’s festival

Two women on a train smile and shake hands

‘Expats’ drills down on Hong Kong’s class divide

Plus, Netflix swallows Trent Dalton, Deborah Mailman remains in ‘Total Control’ and ‘Vanderpump Rules’ returns for another season

Image of a man playing music using electronics and the kora (West African harp)

Three overlooked albums of spiritual jazz from 2023

Recent releases by kora player John Haycock, trumpeter Matthew Halsall and 14-piece jazz ensemble Ancient Infinity Orchestra feel like a refuge from reality