September 3, 2018

Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note September 2018

By Nick Feik

September in Australia means celebrating football fever. But as Wendy Carlisle’s extensive investigation for The Monthly reveals, players may pay a permanent price for their brief moments of on-field glory. While American football has been rocked by claims about the long-term health effects related to concussion, in Australian Rules football the issue has barely raised its head. Yet, as Carlisle writes, “According to Australian Football League concussion expert Professor Paul McCrory, AFL players have higher rates of concussion than NFL gridiron players.”

Is the AFL running interference on the damage concussion can cause? Carlisle’s essay contains a series of alarming revelations.

This month we’re also proud to announce the arrival of our new podcast, The Monthly Hour, in which I present a lively mix of interviews and stories that explore the new issue of the magazine. In the first episode, Helen Garner takes us inside the Broadmeadows Magistrates’ Court. We talk to author Ceridwen Dovey about her cover essay on Australian geneticist David Sinclair, who has discovered a way to reverse ageing. We also hear from Andrew Ford on conductor and composer Leonard Bernstein, and from Thornton McCamish about the legend of “Australia’s James Bond” Laurie Matheson, plus more.

Produced by Sharon Davis, The Monthly Hour is available now on iTunes, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Overcast and other podcasting apps. I hope you can join us.

Nick Feik

Nick Feik is the editor of The Monthly.

@nickfeik

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