August 1, 2016

Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note August 2016

By Nick Feik

As Australia emerges from its post-election stupor and parties begin to evaluate what went right and wrong, this month we focus on the Australian Greens. What did the party deliver in the recent election?

It was the Greens’ deal with the government on Senate voting reform that paved the way for the double dissolution election, yet the party now has fewer representatives in the new parliament than it did in the last. Nationally, the minor-party vote reached record levels, and the candidates running under Pauline Hanson and Nick Xenophon clearly benefited from these particular circumstances. Shouldn’t the Greens, too, have achieved such gains?

As Paddy Manning writes, “The Greens may have succeeded in turning themselves into a major party, in terms of voter perception, right when a backlash against the major parties is peaking.”

Having spent much of the campaign observing the Greens in action, Manning digs deep into their culture and finds a party struggling to forge a clear path, and again just short of true success. So while a political champion for climate change action and social equality has never been more necessary in Australia, and the success or otherwise of the Greens more significant, a clear-eyed assessment of the party, as Paddy Manning delivers, is essential.

Nick Feik

Nick Feik is the editor of The Monthly.

@nickfeik

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