October 30, 2015

Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note November 2015

By Nick Feik

Has there been an independent politician in Australia’s history as successful as Nick Xenophon? At the last election, he polled more upper house votes in South Australia than the Labor Party. At the next one, he’ll be leading a new party and fielding candidates across the state, in both houses. He’s the most influential crossbencher in a divided Senate, and a vital and ceaseless contributor in debates across the national media.

Anne Manne meets the irrepressible Xenophon, a sociable loner, a serious joker, and a peripatetic senator loved dearly in his home town. Her profile provides unparalleled insight into the man whose commitment to the underdog is near-total.

In this month’s second major essay, Jess Hill writes about the Family Court, in particular its treatment of children who’ve suffered abuse at home. Caught up in protracted battles over fathers’ custody rights, children are too often victimised again by the institution meant to be protecting them. It’s scandalous, and Hill’s essay, based on many months of research, ought to provoke a national response.

Nick Feik

Nick Feik is the editor of The Monthly.

@nickfeik

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