February 27, 2015

Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note March 2015

By Nick Feik

While the nation remains captivated by the inordinate dysfunction of the Coalition, it is perhaps unsurprising that Labor has avoided scrutiny. An attacking Opposition is barely necessary at times like this: the government is doing a perfectly good job of destroying itself. Traditionally, though, an Opposition is supposed to present a credible alternative. Rachel Nolan considers the Labor Party’s options, and wonders whether Bill Shorten has what it takes to build a policy platform that will win not just an election but also the support to govern effectively once in office. His work is already overdue.

The time has come, too, for a different national conversation. As Jess Hill writes, “After decades of ignoring domestic violence, Australians have learnt to condemn it.” But what do we really know about its costs and causes, or the gutting of services that aim to prevent it and support the victims? Her essay is a major contribution.

Finally, the Monthly pays its respects to the family of indigenous painter Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda. Quentin Sprague had just completed his essay about the extraordinary career of Mrs Gabori when we learnt of her passing – it stands as a fitting tribute.

Nick Feik

Nick Feik is the editor of The Monthly.

@nickfeik

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