April 23, 2015

Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note May 2015

By Nick Feik

When the Monthly’s publisher, Morry Schwartz, launched the magazine in 2005, he insisted that its success would rest on the quality of its writing.

The Monthly isn’t pitted against other politics and current affairs magazines any more; our old competitors no longer exist. We now appear in the “general” category on the newsagents’ shelves, which in a way is an appropriate place for a magazine with a scope as broad as ours.

In May, the Monthly celebrates its tenth anniversary. We don’t merely survive, though – we thrive! For this our writers are to be thanked.

In this issue, especially, an esteemed cast of contributors has ensured that readers can celebrate too. The work of our regular columnists and critics, Karen Hitchcock, Anwen Crawford, Luke Davies and First Dog on the Moon, is a continuing blessing. They are joined by some of the country’s leading writers and thinkers, including Tim Winton, Helen Garner, Noel Pearson, David Marr, George Megalogenis, Robert Manne, Annabel Crabb, Tim Flannery and Marcia Langton.

For the magazine’s achievements, the Monthly’s previous editors – Christian Ryan, Sally Warhaft, Ben Naparstek and John van Tiggelen – deserve a great deal of credit; our editorial, management, marketing, sales and subscriptions staff have also been instrumental (our CEO, Rebecca Costello, foremost).

It’s a rare privilege to publish a serious magazine in Australia, and to have the ongoing support of advertisers, retailers, writers and, of course, readers. Thank you.

Nick Feik

Nick Feik is the editor of The Monthly.

@nickfeik

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