December 1, 2015

Editor’s Note

Editor's Note December 2015 – January 2016

By Nick Feik

Despite our professed love of irreverence and larrikinism, Australians often have a hard time accepting criticism of our own patriotic ideals, and would prefer not to talk about difficult truths. So it’s with a certain amount of nervous energy that we present our Summer Issue. It includes essays on the real history of Gallipoli and Australia’s “friendship” with East Timor; Karen Hitchcock’s strong argument against the Andrew Denton–led consensus on euthanasia; Anna Krien’s story about Julia the gorilla, who lived in Melbourne Zoo but never quite fit in anywhere; and Chloe Hooper’s profile of Shen Narayanasamy who, with her Transfield divestment campaign, is highlighting the moral effect of how we do business. Also, Robert Manne’s essay illustrates how comprehensively we’ve failed in our actions against climate change.

Megan Davis’ comment addresses another uncomfortable truth: that despite the positive sentiment across Australia regarding indigenous recognition, there is a growing view among those to be “recognised” that if it is not accompanied by reforms to the rolling disaster of indigenous affairs, and if indigenous Australians are excluded from the policy decisions that affect them, it will provide no basis for true reconciliation.

These are compelling issues by which our nation defines and judges itself. Summer is as good a time as any to reconsider them.

Nick Feik

Nick Feik is the editor of The Monthly.

@nickfeik

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