Position Vacant – Online editor
The Monthly is seeking a new Online editor

Job title: Online editor, the Monthly

 

Schwartz Media is looking for an energetic and informed editor to join the team at the Monthly, Australia’s leading current affairs magazine. This role, based in Collingwood, Melbourne, requires someone highly organised and skilled at planning and editing online content, as they’ll be working quickly and independently to a high standard.

 

The successful candidate must have:

-       a keen interest in and solid knowledge of Australian politics, society and culture

-       a voracious appetite for news and current affairs

-       sound editorial judgement and demonstrated copyediting ability

-       a journalism or publishing background, with at least five years' editorial experience

-       an appreciation for quality writing

-       an ability to commission magazine-style writing

-       accuracy and attention to detail while working quickly

-       a sound understanding of the online media landscape

-       experience in managing social media accounts and creating engaging content to suit a variety of social media platforms.

 

Experience with content management systems and MailChimp would be an advantage.

 

To apply, send a CV and cover letter to [email protected], marked to the attention of the Monthly’s editor, Nick Feik.

 

Applications close at 5 pm on Friday, 10 April 2015.

Read on

Cold was the ground: ‘Sorry for Your Trouble’

Richard Ford delivers an elegant collection of stories of timeworn men and women contemplating the end

Image of Australians queuing at Centrelink in Brisbane.

Moral bankruptcy

Robodebt stemmed from the false ideological division between the deserving and undeserving poor, but the government still clings to moralistic language

Image of Gough Whitlam in October 1975

It’s about time

The High Court’s landmark ruling on the ‘Palace Papers’ is a win for Australian social democracy

Image of Robyn Davidson

Something mythic

For Robyn Davidson, her acclaimed memoir ‘Tracks’ was an act of freedom whose reception hemmed her in


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