Monthly Wire

Welcome First Dog on the Moon!

The Monthly is delighted to announce that its July issue (on shelves Monday) will feature First Dog on the Moon in the first of regular Monthly contributions.

The new cartoon, The Rum Corps, has been developed for the Monthly and will appear exclusively in the print edition. Subtitled “Exciting adventures in police corruption", each month of The Rum Corps will feature a different historical episode of Australian police corruption. The first instalment features the story of Graham “Chook" Fowler (portrayed, naturally, as a chook), a NSW policeman based in Kings Cross in the 80s and 90s, who was eventually charged with corruption, but is perhaps best remembered for the sham incident when he “slipped” on a strawberry milkshake that had been spilt on the floor of the Sydney City Police Station, in order to win a payout.

First Dog on the Moon is editorial cartoonist at the Guardian.

Says First Dog:

"I am very excited about being part of the gritty, streetwise team that has put together this hard-hitting expose into the wrongdoings of those men and women in blue who should be looking out for Australian Families but are not. 

Be warned, police corruption is not sexy or interesting, it is bad and you are bad for wanting to read about it.

These cartoons will treat the issue of police corruption very seriously and will no doubt be pivotal in the implementation of a Federal ICAC-style permanent national investigation into police corruption which is bad.

So stop enjoying it and making fun of it with marsupials and talking milkshakes you should be ashamed of yourselves no wonder the country is in such a mess.

Warm regards, 

Former Detective Sergeant Inspector Constable Onthemoon (not ever an actual police person)"

 

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