Australian politics, society & culture

Monthly Wire

By The Monthly
Media Release Friday, 14 March 2014   John van Tiggelen has resigned as editor of the Monthly. Schwartz Media is pleased to announce that he has taken up a new position as staff writer with the magazine. Nick Feik has been appointed as the new editor of the Monthly and will take over the role on 2 April. Nick Feik is currently the magazine’s online editor, responsible for the Shortlist Daily and PoliticOz e-newsletters, SlowTV/Monthly video and the Monthly blog.   Morry Schwartz, Monthly publisher: “It has been a great pleasure to work with John over the past two years. During this time the Monthly has maintained its high quality and prospered. I look forward to working with him as a writer. I’ve been working with Nick for a very long time and I am confident that this next phase will be as successful as everything else he has put his hand to in the past.” John van Tiggelen: “I’ve been looking forward to this change, partly for family reasons: I’ve been commuting from central Victoria to Collingwood for well over two years now. The magazine will be in very safe hands with Nick, and I’m thankful that Morry has been so gracious as to enable me to continue working for the Monthly for another year at least.” Nick Feik: “The Monthly has become Australia’s most important news and current affairs magazine, thanks to the inspired efforts of its previous editors. I look forward to taking the lead myself, and shaping the magazine for the future. I’ve worked very successfully with Morry Schwartz for many years now, so I also look forward to working with him in a new capacity – and the same goes for my good friend and colleague John van Tiggelen.”     For further enquiries, contact: Nicole Howard The Monthly [email protected] 03 9486 0288
By The Monthly
  Ten highlights from a magnificent year of long-form magazine writing:   Royal bodies (Hilary Mantel, London Review of Books) Thanksgiving in Mongolia (Ariel Levy, New Yorker) Danse Macabre: A scandal at the Bolshoi Ballet (David Remnick, New Yorker) Dzhokhar Tsarnaev: Jahar's World (Janet Reitman, Rolling Stone) Facebook feminism, like it or not  (Susan Faludi, The Baffler) Love in the Gardens (Zadie Smith, New York Review of Books)  For 40 years, this Russian family was cut off from all human contact, unaware of World War II (Mike Dash, Smithsonian) Gangster bankers: Too big to jail (Matt Taibbi, Rolling Stone) Fat City (Karen Hitchcock, The Monthly)  The impossible refugee boat lift to Christmas Island (Luke Mogelson, New York Times) 
By The Monthly
The rise of the internet photo collection continued in 2013. We're indebted to all of these artists and photographers, amateur and professional, for their work; and all of the curators, of course. Here are ten of our favourite galleries of the year:   A Deadly Alkaline Lake in Africa Turns Animals into Calcified Statues (This is Colossal) What Ali Wore (Tumblr) Intimate National Geographic Portraits of the Serengeti lion (The Atlantic) Maleonn's mobile photo studio (Guardian) Winners of the Red Bull Illume Photo Contest 2013 (The Atlantic) A New Kind of Beauty (Slate) Liu Bolin: Hiding in the City (Slate) Chicken Portraits (CNN) Travel Photographer of the Year 2013 (Guardian) TIME Picks the Top Ten Photos of 2013 (TIME)    
By The Monthly
In 2013, magazine and newspaper writing about health blossomed. Whether about new research, historical context, mental wellbeing, or major medical or social issues, discussions about health have engaged an increasingly aware and voracious global readership. Here are some of our favourite pieces of the year: - The vitamin myth: Why we think we need supplements (The Atlantic)  - Fat city (The Monthly)  - Some of my best friends are germs (New York Times) - The D.S.M and the nature of disease (New Yorker) - How animals may cause the next big one (New York Review of Books) - Imagining the post-antibiotics future (Medium) - The doctor who made a revolution (New York Review of Books) - Experts reshape treatment guide for cholesterol (New York Times) - The disturbing, shameful history of childbirth deaths (Slate) - Death by masculinity (Project Syndicate) 
By The Monthly
By Monthly Wire
Joe Dolce is a singer-songwriter, poet and essayist.  This is Joe's letter to Monthly editor John van Tiggelen, written just prior to the publication of 'Shaddap You Facebook' in the April 2013 issue of the magazine:     Hi John, OK – I can live with the ‘Shaddap You Facebook’ title. This once. Under normal circumstances, I don’t permit jerry-rigging my poetry and essay writing to ‘Shaddap You Face’ (except briefly in bio information) as it is counter-productive to both our goals – they are in completely different audience demographics. ‘Shaddap You Face’ fans either don’t understand my poetry and essays – or don't care, if they can't hum it – and the fans of my serious writing then seriously tend to take my serious writing less seriously. (Err … if you get my drift.) Thank god for Les Murray coming out of nowhere and publishing 60 poems and lyrics of mine over the last two years. Who could ask for a better advocate? That’s a shaddap-you-face-of-a-different-colour to silence the mono-minded skeptics. But here’s something you should know. I came up with the phrase ‘Shaddap You Facebook’ two years ago and even wrote a parody of my song with it as the title that my publisher loves and is presently on pitch to Mushroom Records. It has been in the recording project pipeline for a while and hopefully will see the light of day, most likely sung by some young pimple-faced emo-Goth, with a possible cameo by me.  Here’s some of the lyrics: SHADDAP YOU FACEBOOK   (Hello – my Facebook name is Giuseppi. I got Friend Request for you. Uno, due, tre, quatro:)   Once I had some FRIENDS they write on my WALL they used to click LIKE and put LOL we send a lot MESSAGE on the CHATLINE everything was-a fine   Now I got some guy pretending he's a girl I get-a Farm Animals a Profile that's a squirrel I really feel-a sick I don’t know what to make (of it) everybody she’s a fakin it     (One time for mama – she’s a no gotta Facebook.) Whatsa matta me, hey, I gotta get a life I BLOCK and DELETE but my FRIEND LIST is a joke I get another POKE everytime I take a look, Ah, Shaddap You Facebook! But, hey, John, due to the nature of this particular essay – the porn complaint originating from Facebook’s total incompetence – it is strangely appropriate in this instance. Best wishes, Joe
By Monthly Wire
A frustrated politician: Rupert Murdoch in 1985. © Roger Ressmeyer/Corbis & Rupert Murdoch after facing the Leveson inquiry, 26 April 2012. © Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images
By Monthly Wire

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