Twirling towards freedom

Snag votes

ABC’s Vote Compass has already provided some insight into what’s in the hearts and minds of the voters in the country’s key political battlegrounds, but what will be in their stomachs on polling day? The answer is handily provided by the 2013 Federal Election Day Sausage Sizzle and Cake Stall Map, which allows voters to key in their address and click through the descriptions offered up by local primary schools.

The electorate of Flynn, in rural Queensland, wants less spending on university and fewer new immigrants. They’re also the most in favour of turning back asylum seeker boats, as well as never allowing those aboard to settle in Australia. Their nearest sausage sizzle, at Thabehan State School, encourages voters to display a sense of community spirit and togetherness. “Bring your appetite and eat with us.”

The constituents of Sydney’s southern seat of Grayndler are most in favour of Australia ending the monarchy and becoming a republic, but their local primary school is one of the few that will boast a jumping castle on polling day.

Over in the central Queensland seat of Hinkler, where constituents are most in favour of decreasing our foreign aid budget, you can participate in a Money Tree Raffle. And the central Queensland seat of Maranoa, where constituents want the government to do less to combat climate change, hosts one of the few polling places to bother noting that water will be provided.

For those of us who are suffering chronic election fatigue it’s worth noting that this is the one decision to be made at the polling booths that we can be genuinely excited about. A real decision that will directly impact you and your family. Which local primary school is offering up the best sausage sizzle?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michaela McGuire

Michaela McGuire is a journalist and the author of Last Bets: A True Story of Gambling, Morality and the Law and the Penguin Special A Story of Grief. Visit her blog, Twirling Towards Freedom.

@michaelamcguire

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