Australian politics, society & culture

Paul Kelly

Paul Kelly and Kevin Rudd laughing together at the launch of The March of Patriots in 2009
Contesting Paul Kelly’s ‘Triumph and Demise’
By Robert Manne
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
Andrew McMillan
By Chips Mackinolty
Hans Poulsen on a natural high, 1971.
The golden age of singer–songwriters
By Robert Forster
Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, 2011. © Sam Karanikos
Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu’s 'Rrakala'
By Robert Forster
Paul Kelly’s "Songs from the South"
By Robert Forster
It can seem futile trying to chase down biographical material on Paul Kelly because, just as he's ducked the glare of mainstream pop stardom, his self-effacement and unease with his past have left the songs to sketch the details, a situation he probably feels comfortable with. The bones of the story are: he is born
Illustrations by Peter Hudson & Gurindji schoolchildren
By Mungo MacCallum
This is the book of the song that has become the anthem of the reconciliation movement. A century after the birth of Vincent Lingiari and 20 years after his death, the walkout of stockmen he led at Wave Hill Station in 1966 and its triumphant resolution in 1975 remains a turning point in Australian history: the
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
By Mungo MacCallum
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
Changing of the Guard
By Robert Manne
Why We Need a Change of Government
By Robert Manne
In the October issue of the Australian Literary Review, Australia's most influential political journalist, Paul Kelly, published an article attacking Australia's intellectuals. Kelly sought to turn Donald Horne on his head. Horne had famously described Australia as a "lucky country run mainly by second-rate people".
By Mungo MacCallum
At the beginning of 1971 the Australian Labor Party found itself in the unusual position of having some spare money in the bank. A little over a year earlier Gough Whitlam had produced a massive swing to Labor, putting the party within easy striking distance of government the next time around, and businesses who had
Some Australian examples
By John Hirst
My Australian collection begins early, at Sydney Cove in 1789, the second year of the convict settlement. The nature of this anomalous society is still not well understood. Since the population consisted of convicts and military it is assumed that the military controlled the convicts. This is not so. The military had
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
By Mungo MacCallum
Writing ‘Ordinary People’s Politics’
By Judith Brett
"I can't stress enough how important it is for you to just be an ordinary person. You know, there aren't enough ordinary persons around. There are real high-flyers and jetsetters and all those sorts of things. There's a place for them. But I just think there are too many of them. There aren't
What happened in East Timor
By Mark Aarons
José Ramos Horta’s appointment as prime minister, on 8 July, has – for the time being, at least – brought a measure of stability to East Timor. There is hope that one of the world’s newest nations will rebuild its political, social and economic foundations, shattered by the events of recent times. The new prime
By Clive James
The nickname ‘Diamond Jim’ fitted James McClelland the way ‘Big Julie from Chicago’ fitted the gangster in Guys and Dolls who rolled spotless dice, with the difference that Diamond Jim wasn’t acting. He was really like what his nickname said: spruce, sparkling, charming, the Australian politician with the touch of the
Still comfortable but relaxed no more in John Howard's Australia
By John Birmingham
The feeling that it was a good town to leave was only confirmed when I returned a decade later to cover the freak show that the rest of the country knew as Pauline Hanson and One Nation. I can’t recall which magazine sent me up there, but I remember only too well picking up a copy of the local newspaper, The