Australian politics, society & culture

Lawyers

Race, recognition and a more complete Commonwealth
By Noel Pearson
What makes a litigant turn vexatious?
By Sam Bungey
Peter Sutton at a Wik outstation in 1977: “That period seems a little innocent now”. Photo courtesy of David Martin
An anthropologist hits the skids in Cape York
By Catherine Ford
Clive James, 2006. © David Levenson/Getty Images
A correspondence with Clive James
By Paola Totaro
By Margaret Simons
By Guy Pearse
Glenn Beutel has heard of The Castle but has no plans to see the film about a suburban family who win a David-and-Goliath battle to save their house from an airport expansion. Glenn’s plight is immediately reminiscent of that beloved Australian film, though: he is the last remaining homeowner in the tiny town of
The methadone program at 40
By Gail Bell
Ask the old hands what they think about the methadone maintenance program in Australia 40 years in and you’ll hear a good deal of pragmatism. “It’s like the electricity bill. You want light at the flick of a switch, you’ve got to sign up and pay for it. Simple as.” Ask the same people what they know about methadone
Harry Kakavas and problem gamblers
By Paul Barry
Harry Kakavas was one of Australia’s top real-estate salesmen. He made a fortune selling houses on the Gold Coast. He was also one of Australia’s biggest gamblers. In 14 months from June 2005 Kakavas slapped down almost $1.5 billion on the baccarat tables at Crown Casino in Melbourne – betting $300,000 a hand – and
A short history of the media future
By John Birmingham
In the year of our Lord 2007, I built a library. Indeed, I built two. One of them, a professional library, was built into an office where I carry out the pleasant business of penning novels, essays and columns. The other was a formal library – nothing more or less. In the professional library, I can bend over and
Robert G Kaiser’s ‘So Damn Much Money’
By Guy Pearse
Robert Kaiser’s exposé of lobbying in Washington, DC helps to explain why Barack Obama has declared “war on lobbyists”. It also leaves the Australian reader very uneasy about the cosy détente between government and lobbyists here, and the consequent lack of reform.So Damn Much Money (
Noel Pearson’s "Up from the Mission"
By Peter Sutton
Most Australians probably know Noel Pearson in just one or two of his aspects: as the regional leader, lawyer and activist from Cape York Peninsula, or as the national media commentator on Indigenous policy and politics. But his complexities, his gifts and possibly his flaws are Shakespearian in range. Most of the
Life in a Bangkok Prison
By Harry Nicolaides
Compound One. For weeks I lay on my back, delirious with influenza. When I was able to stand, I shuffled around like a zombie, pushed here and there by the heaving population of sweaty, half-naked inmates, most of them Thai, Burmese or Cambodian.One night I was so overcome with anxiety that I started to hyperventilate
The King & I
By Harry Nicolaides
Compound One. For weeks I lay on my back, delirious with influenza. When I was able to stand, I shuffled around like a zombie, pushed here and there by the heaving population of sweaty, half-naked inmates, most of them Thai, Burmese or Cambodian. One night I was so overcome with anxiety that I started to
By Zora Simic
Perhaps by virtue of his own accomplishments, Malcolm Gladwell - author of bestsellers The Tipping Point and Blink, writer for the New Yorker, and well-paid speaker and guru - has a vested interest in the topic of success. Yet, in publicity for his latest book, Gladwell has resisted calling himself an outlier,
Barack Obama at campaign rally in Cleveland, Ohio. Image: TonyTheTiger at en.wikipedia
Getting Elected in Zanesville, Ohio
By Don Watson
By Galarrwuy Yunupingu
My land is that of the Gumatj clan nation, which is carefully defined, with boundaries and borders set out in the maps of our minds and, today, on djurra, or paper. We have our own laws, repeated in ceremonial song cycles and known to all members of our clan nation. Sung into our ears as babies, disciplined into our
The Penalty Is Death
By Luke Davies
By Chloe Hooper
When I first travelled to Palm Island, to attend the inquest into Cameron Doomadgee's death in custody, I was venturing into Astley country. The great Thea Astley (1925-2004) had a love of the fecundity and the rot of tropical life, of small communities where agoraphobia and claustrophobia commingle, and she was one

Pages