Australian politics, society & culture

ENVIRONMENT

Goolarabooloo law man Joseph Roe on Cable Beach in Broome. © Simon Penn
Kimberley Politics
By Victoria Laurie
GetUp!
By Kathy Marks
Midway through the evening, a short video is projected onto the living-room wall, featuring clips from GetUp!’s election advertisements and plaudits from television personalities such as David Koch (“exactly what we need to keep the so-and-sos honest”). There is a great deal of whooping and cheering, then the
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
The Rise of the Greens
By Robert Manne
Film still from Andrei Tarkovsky's 'Stalker'. © Photos 12/Alamy
By Nicolas Rothwell
Ginger Snap at a rally demanding legislative protection from discrimination for sex workers in Sydney, June 2010. © AFP/Greg Wood
By Emily Maguire
By Guy Pearse
Most of us think of Aussie coalmining as a local issue, and why not? Coal exports have doubled since 1992 and are set to do so again by 2020. The consequent scars across the Hunter Valley and central Queensland are visible from space, as anyone with Google Earth can see. Whether it’s the 23% of our exports that coal
Parliament House, Canberra. © JJ Harrison
By Mark Aarons
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
By Kathy Marks
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
By Guy Pearse
A recyclable and re-configurable shop design for Aesop by March Studio, Flinders Lane, Melbourne. © Amanda de Simone
The State of Design Festival
By Alan Saunders
Inside the Amazon warehouse, Fernley, Nervada, 2003. © Macduff Everton/Corbis
By Malcolm Knox
By Guy Pearse
Having moved so far to the Right, both major parties are perceived by many to have lost touch with their political roots. On one side, the Liberal Party is unrecognisable to those who once led it. Doyens of the party’s right-wing in their day, Malcolm Fraser and John Hewson are now constant critics: of its foreign
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
By Gail Bell
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
Rudd's Collapse
By Robert Manne
The 17th Biennale of Sydney
By Juliana Engberg
The marketing material for the seventeenth Biennale of Sydney displays a lusty engagement with the semiotics of font. Using the agitprop colours of red, black and white, the über-cool British designers Barnbrook deliver a bastard mix of divine and dirty lettering, combining the styles of Deutsche-Gothic and Soviet

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