Australian politics, society & culture

Environment

To preserve Port Phillip Bay, Melbourne should learn from Sydney
By Tim Flannery
Is it possible that the world’s songbirds all come from Australia? Yes, according to biologist Tim Low in his fascinating ornithological history of Australia, Where Song Began. Low’s wonderfully readable book literally turns the map upside down and makes a compelling case for the origin of birds in the antipodes. Join
For the 40th anniversary of one of Australia’s worst natural disasters, Sophie Cunningham has written a fascinating history of the event, Warning: The story of Cyclone Tracy. Drawing from eyewitness accounts of those who experienced the devastation, Cunningham has created an exhilarating and deeply compassionate
Don Watson’s The Bush is one of the finest accounts of Australia ever written. The beauty of Watson’s prose sits against the brutality of his story, and together these elements create a story far richer than the myths of Australia we’ve so long preferred. Watson speaks to Jane McCredie at Adelaide Writers’ Week
Rugby star David Pocock says sport and politics are always mixed
By Sam Vincent
Hugh Mackay is a passionate chronicler of human interactions. At the Perth Writers Festival 2015 he reads from and discusses his new book, The Art of Belonging, which reignites the conversation about how we want to live. Drawing on 50 years’ experience as a social researcher, Mackay creates a fictional suburb,
George Marshall is the author of Don’t Even Think About It: Why our brains are wired to ignore climate change. As part of La Trobe University's Ideas and Society program, he joins Professor Robert Manne at the Wheeler Centre in Melbourne to discuss the complex psychology behind climate change denial.
Are we generally optimistic or are we tending more and more towards pessimism? Despite the current state of environmental and political affairs, former Greens leader Bob Brown (author of the memoir Optimism) seems firmly entrenched in the positive camp; having just completed a book on the influence of
The BARK program at Arthur Gorrie Correctional Centre sees prisoners taking care of dogs
By Andrew McMillen
The Adelaide Zoo has a chequered past
By Anna Goldsworthy
Naomi Klein’s ‘This Changes Everything’
By Robert Manne
Anote Tong, president of Kiribati, on Svalbard.
The president of Kiribati goes on a fact-finding mission in the Arctic
By John van Tiggelen
Elizabeth Kolbert (The Sixth Extinction) and scientist Dr John Williams explore the science surrounding climate change, the effects of land clearing and agriculture, and their impact on the planet’s biodiversity, and eventual survival.
A young boy holding two dead possums at a trappers camp in the Blackall district, Queensland, 1908
From stick insects to swagmen in Don Watson’s ‘The Bush’
By John Hirst
Cartoon showing man fighting cactus
In central Victoria, locals are taking up arms against the invading wheel cactus
By John van Tiggelen
The week that was nonsense
By Michaela McGuire
On Tuesday night, 18-year-old Abdul Numan Haider stabbed two counter-terrorism police officers outside the Endeavour Hills police station in Melbourne’s south-east and was shot dead. Yesterday’s editions of The Age, Sydney Morning Herald and Canberra Times dedicated the front page of their print editions to the

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