Australian politics, society & culture

ABC

Illustration
Behind the scenes with the young Aussie comedian
By Ronnie Scott
By Michaela McGuire
In October 2013, ABC TV and Screen Australia announced a call out for ‘Fresh Blood’, an initiative that offered twenty aspiring comedy creators grants of $10,000 to nurture talent from a new generation of Australian comics. Last week, the fruits of the project launched on iView, and the Australian
Andrew Bolt and Tony Abbott. © Jason Edwards / Newspix
Why do Andrew Bolt and company love to hate the national broadcaster?
By Don Watson
'As I was Saying: A Collection of Musings' by Robert Dessaix, Vintage Australia, 224pp;$27.95
In conversation with Robert Dessaix
By Gail Bell
Words: Shane Maloney | Illustration: Chris Grosz
By Shane Maloney and Chris Grosz
Words: Shane Maloney | Illustration: Chris Grosz
By Shane Maloney and Chris Grosz
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
By Anna Goldsworthy
Illustration by Jeff Fisher.
By Charles Firth
By Kerryn Goldsworthy
Any poet could have told the ABC that with a name like Vulture its new arts program was bound to get negative feedback. A vulture is an ugly, disgusting creature whose presence lets you know your death is imminent.This may be why one blogger, having watched the first episode, said it made him lose the will to live. It
What’s a hard-working TV legend supposed to do when his fans stop watching him?
By Matthew Ricketson
Promo by Ray Martin on Channel Nine at 6.25 p.m.:“Coming up on A Current Affair – dangerous footpaths.Don’t trip, the Council will blame you.Plus, are we really ready for war?”No doubt about Ray, he’s always got his priorities right.The Latham Diaries: March 7, 2003Ray Martin is talking the moment he shakes hands,
By John Harms
In the Cricketers Bar at Melbourne’s Windsor Hotel, shortly after the Swans’ AFL grand final victory, a bloke from Sydney told me the ABC was doctoring the weather. He claimed he had heard from an impeccable source that some towns never ever appear on ABC-TV weather reports, particularly in reference to rainfall.
By Kerryn Goldsworthy
Among people who get their current affairs from the ABC or SBS, the consensus is that A Current Affair and Today Tonight rate their socks off by relying on stories about neighbourhood feuds, sex scandals, dodgy salesmen, weight loss, welfare cheats and bras. It’s true: people watch these shows because their taxes,
To understand the place you must first understand the Bundaberg Bear
By John Harms
Sarge is firing up. “Noosa is the re-invention capital of the universe. It’s all a facade. The houses are like a Western movie set. Big fronts and nothing behind them. And the pricks are furtively pulling cans of Home Brand baked beans off the shelves so they can pay their mortgages. It’s all so self-conscious. They
To understand the place you must first understand the Bundaberg Bear
By John Harms
I watch the Melbourne of my imagination disappear under low clouds. Urbane Melbourne, where conversation matters, where people take an interest in what is going on and have a pride in the culture they inherited and are adding to. It is a place that has lived up to my expectations. I don’t think it’s home. I’m
Charles MacKarras and the quest for authenticity
By Stephen Fay
Sir Neville Cardus, the legendary cricket writer and music critic, chose to spend the World War II years in Sydney rather than London. Young Australian musicians would seek him out at his home in Kings Cross and ask if he thought they would be able to make a career in Europe when the war was over. One young oboist
It's raining at last in the bush, where there is no confidence, only hope.
By John Harms
You should start in a place like Deer Park, where I find myself now, in a hire car so mass-produced that 45 minutes ago in the city depot I expected the uniformed customer service attendant to draw on her uniformed phrase book and ask me, at just the right moment, whether I wanted fries with my four-cylinder sedan.
Graham Kennedy was an eyes-popping perfectionist, a subversive pre-feminist, a rebel without any trousers on.
By Kerryn Goldsworthy
Among the many thousands of words written in the days after Graham Kennedy died, one memory recurred like a refrain: Kennedy’s uncanny gift for TV. “Because it was a new medium,” said Stuart Wagstaff, “very few people knew how to handle it; for some inexplicable reason, Graham did.” John Mangos, the last person to

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